Centre for Environmental Policy and Advocacy (CEPA)

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Centre for Environmental Policy and Advocacy (CEPA) is a not for profit public interest non-governmental organization registered as a company limited by guarantee in 2002. CEPA seeks to contribute to the development of environment and natural resources management best practices in Malawi and the Southern Africa Region.

As a think tank organization, CEPA provides advice and conducts research in environment and natural resources management policies and legislation with a view to designing appropriate interventions for promoting sustainable environment and natural resources management.

Our work concentrates on sound environmental governance; in this respect, issues of accountability, institutional strengthening and representation are at the core of our activities.

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  • Theme "Small Island States and Climate Change"

    World Environment Day which falls on 5th June each yearis a day set asideby the United Nations as a principle occasion for; encouraging worldwide awareness and action for the environment, stimulate the political attention and action and also to enhance the personal commitment to environmental preservation. The day was established by the United Nations General Assembly in 1972 and it is annually celebratedOn the same day, the General Assembly created the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), which is now the United Nations’ principal agency for environmental action. The UNEP annually decides and releases an international theme under which the countries are expected to celebrate the World Environment Days.

    Theme for International Celebrations
    The World Environment Day main international celebrations are hosted by different cities every year. In 2014 the theme for the main international celebrations is, “Small Island Developing States and Climate Change” and also under the official slogan “raise your voice not the sea level”and the venue is Bridgetown in Barbados in the Caribbean as confirmed by UNEP.  The theme and slogan focus on the impacts of climate change on the small islands and what the humanity needs to do in order to protect these islands, which are the important habitats for human beings and other biodiversity from sinking.

    by the United Nations as a principle occasion for; encouraging worldwide awareness and action for the environment, stimulate the political attention and action and also to enhance the personal commitment to environmental preservation. The day was established by the United Nations General Assembly in 1972 and it is annually celebratedOn the same day, the General Assembly created the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), which is now the United Nations’ principal agency for environmental action. The UNEP annually decides and releases an international theme under which the countries are expected to celebrate the World Environment Days.

    Theme for International Celebrations
    The World Environment Day main international celebrations are hosted by different cities every year. In 2014 the theme for the main international celebrations is, “Small Island Developing States and Climate Change” and also under the official slogan “raise your voice not the sea level”and the venue is Bridgetown in Barbados in the Caribbean as confirmed by UNEP.  The theme and slogan focus on the impacts of climate change on the small islands and what the humanity needs to do in order to protect these islands, which are the important habitats for human beings and other biodiversity from sinking.

    Theme for National (Malawi) Celebrations
    Traditionally, all the member states of the United Nations including Malawi hold national celebrations on or around the 5th June every year.In Malawi, the international theme has been translated into a local theme which is; “Vulnerable Ecosystems and Climate Change” and also into the national language (Chichewa) which is, “Tisamalechilengedwekutitipewemavutoakudzakambakakusinthakwanyengo”.


    Traditionally, all the member states of the United Nations including Malawi hold national celebrations on or around the 5th June every year.In Malawi, the international theme has been translated into a local theme which is; “Vulnerable Ecosystems and Climate Change” and also into the national language (Chichewa) which is, “Tisamalechilengedwekutitipewemavutoakudzakambakakusinthakwanyengo”.

     

  • His Excellence, Prof Arthur Peter Muthalika was among the 12 presidential candidates who committed to sustainable climate change, environment and natural resources management Centre for Environmental Policy and advocacy (CEPA) and Association for Environmental Journalists (AEJ) engaged all the presidential candidates on specific environmental related priority areas a week before the tri partite elections. Some of the priorities that these two organizations were crying for included that the new government should;

    • Strengthen operations of local government institutions to manage wastes and implement Public Private Partnership arrangements to improve on waste management;
    • Not to sign Mining contracts that DO NOT have a transparent Environmental and Social Impact Assessment;
    • Invest in research and strengthen linkages between climate change, environment and natural resources management and academia and development;
    • Create a SEPARATE VOTE for disaster risk management in the national budget;
    • Functionalize ADMARCs to improve farmers access to agricultural markets;
    • Support practical climate smart technologies to enhance community resilience to climate change effects;
    • Provide alternative income generating sources to charcoal producers, plant more trees and monitor the survival of planted trees;
    • Reduce tariffs on solar energy devices to promote localized renewable which is currently a major setback to environmental sustainability and community resilience to climate impacts;
    • Improve budget allocations to all climate change, environment and natural resources related sectors; and
    • Introduce, strengthen, implement and enforce effective environmental policies and laws.
    Apart from these major political parties, United Democratic Front, Peoples Party, Malawi Congress Party, People’s Transformation Party, New Labour Party’s, People's Progressive Movement, Tisintha Alliance and Mafunde, National Salvation Front, Umodzi Party’s, Chipani cha Pfuko and United Independent Party signed the commitment. All these presidential candidates told the press immediately that the country needed laws with stiffer penalties to the
  • In April 2014, The Department of Disaster Management Affairs (DoDMA) commenced the development of the Disaster Risk Management Devolution Plan to ensure that disaster risks are efficiently managed at local level through devolving central government functions and responsibilities to Local Authorities (Las). The development of the devolution plan is in line with National Decentralization Policy, which was approved by Cabinet in 1998, the Malawi Government has been implementing the  Decentralization Programme since 2001 as an efficient means of delivering public services to the people, especially the poor, by devolving central government functions and responsibilities to LAs. According to the Principle of Subsidiarity, Decentralization ensures that functions are performed closest to the communities in order to deliver services in a responsive, timely, efficient, effective and inclusive manner.  By the nature of DRM activities that DoDMA implements as well as the nature of the beneficiaries targeted by these interventions, DoDMA has, to some extent, been implementing these activities in a decentralized manner. For instance, since December 2010, 14 District Disaster Risk Reduction Offices have supported the headquarters structure in implementing DRM interventions at the district and local level. 
    DoDMA presents this Devolution Plan as a positive milestone towards responding to the natural imperative of unlocking its potential to plan, execute and coordinate Disaster Risk Management (DRM) programmes in a responsive, timely, effective, efficient and inclusive manner.  DoDMA is convinced that the devolution of some of its functions to LAs will facilitate the achievement of the sector’s overall national aspiration of improving and safeguarding the quality of life of Malawians, especially those vulnerable to and affected by disasters, thereby increasing the sector’s contribution to the socio-economic development of the country.

    Keep checking this space for a final copy

  • FEWS NET Food Security Update report for the month of May 2014 has been posted on the website. You can read the report on the following link: http://www.fews.net/southern-africa/malawi/food-security-outlook-update/fri-2014-05-30.

  • Civil Society on Climate Change (CISONECC) welcomed 2014 with several big productive events starting with a two-day advocacy strategy revision workshop held last February in Lilongwe facilitated by Southern Voice’s advocacy trainer, Raja Jarrah from the UK.
    CISONECC members roll up their sleeves using the theory of change to reprioritize CISONECC’s goals and objectives.
    The Workshop was attended by fifteen members of CISONECC who were introduced to the theory of change which enabled them to reprioritize CISONECC’s objectives.  The intensive workshop also involved the group’s developing SMART objectives for each of thegoals and brainstorming on ways to influence potential allies and opponents to ensure the advocacy’s success.
    The revised strategy, which is meant to guide the Organization until December 2016 contains a smaller number of more focused objectives and provides a visible link between the desired policy changes and impact goal.  Containing a set of target audiences, the new document also has a monitoring component which measures accomplishments..
    After establishing a set of criteria with which to scale the importance of issues including the advantage of working together as a group vis a vis as individual organizations, and considering issues which can attract funding, CISONECC selected three priority issues:

    1. How Malawi develops its National Adaptation Plan
    2. How Malawi implements its national policies on climate change and disaster risk management
    3. How Malawi gains access to adaptation funding made available under the UNFCCC

    A breakout group intently discusses potential supporters and opponents to the immediate establishment of the National Implementing Entity to enable access to international adaptation funds.

    After a thorough reality check on what the Organization could do as a cohesive body within a predetermined timeline, participants used the SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-bound) method to establishthe following policy change objectives:

    1. National adaptation priorities are established based on community-driven processes by 2015.
    1. CC and DRM policy instruments are approved and multi-stakeholder monitoring of implementation is influencing the design of plans and programmes from 2015 onwards.

     

    1. The national institutional mechanism for adaptation funding, from sources under the UNFCCC, gives direct access to civil society organisations by 2015.

    Going overtime, the participants created sets of milestones for each objective which provides a
    gauge which CISONECC can use in moving forward and determining necessary changes in activities.  As a last exercise, potential allies and opponents who have to be dealt with to advance its advocacies were identified.

    2014 brings with it not just national elections but an overwhelming sense of duty from members of civil society who have chosen climate change as their priority area